• How I Graduated From Law School With A Job

    How I Graduated From Law School With A Job

    The job market is horrible. You can walk around moaning and groaning about it. You can join in with the complainers out there, debating whether law school is worth the time and effort. However, that’s not going to help you get a job.

    Getting a job is difficult, stressful, time-consuming, and lots of other horrible adjectives. But, I want you to know that it can also be a life-changing experience. You have the choice to make it rough and tough; or, you can follow some simple tips and tricks to put yourself one step closer to landing a job. I’m not guaranteeing it will be your dream job right away, but it’s somewhere better than your current position, right?

    Earlier this week, I reached out to a few friends from across the country that recently graduated from law school and obtained legal jobs. I have compiled below a number of tips, tricks, and suggestions that you can implement as you embark upon your own job search.

  • BMW Faces Patent Lawsuit Over In-car Hotspots

    Cross-posted on the ABA-IPL’s Law Student Action Group blog. BMW’s removable “Car Hotspot LTE” system is controlled from the center console and can support up to 8 devices.On Wednesday, Antennatech, LLC filed a five-page complaint against BMW of North America LLC for patent infringement.  There are two patents allegedly violated by BMW: U.S. Patent No. […]

  • This WEEK in LAW Discussion of eBook Article

    This WEEK in LAW Discussion of eBook Article

    A few weeks back, the This WEEK in LAW panel discussed one of my recent blog posts on an eBook deal in 2011 that violated an earlier publication deal from 1971.  Guest panelist Nancy Sims brought up an excellent comparison Supreme Court case, New York Times v. Tasini, from 2000. Sims discussed the negative outcome […]

  • Apple, Netflix, Amazon, and More Face Lawsuit Over Media Transfer Patent

    Apple, Netflix, Amazon, and More Face Lawsuit Over Media Transfer Patent

    On Friday, iMTX Strategic LLC filed a series of nearly identical complaints in Delaware federal court against multiple media technology companies for an alleged violation of U.S. Patent No. 7,269,854.  The patent, called “Transaction System for Transporting Media Files from Content Provider Sources to Home Entertainment Devices,” purports to control the method in which a user’s […]

  • Comic Book Creator Takes Battle to U.S. Supreme Court

    Comic Book Creator Takes Battle to U.S. Supreme Court

    Image credit: Susan SkaarAt the end of March, Jack Kirby’s descendants took their legal battle against Marvel Comics to the next level by filing a petition for writ of certiorari to the Supreme Court of the United States.  Jack “King” Kirby is one of the most well-known figures in the history of comic books, known for creating and co-creating iconic characters such as the X-Men, Iron Man, the Incredible Hulk, and the Fantastic Four. 

    Kirby’s estate has been fighting in a battle that began in early 2010 for the termination of an earlier transfer of ownership in copyrights to the characters that Kirby helped create and still maintain large amounts of popularity, as well as profit-generation. 

    Termination Rights: The Works Made for Hire Exception

    The Copyright Act of 1976 contains a provision known as “termination rights.”  Termination rights have become more and more popular as we have just recently started reaching the thirty-five-year mark for many copyrights registered following the 1976 Act.  In 17 U.S.C. 304(c) and (d), artists are given the ability terminate their transfer rights – effectively allowing them to reclaim ownership of their copyrighted works thirty-five years after transferring them to another party.  Congress intended this to provide original creators and their heirs the ability to recover rights that might have been assigned or licensed based upon the previous provisions of the Copyright Act.

  • A Lesson In Contract Drafting: eBook Deal Violates Publisher's Copyright

    A Lesson In Contract Drafting: eBook Deal Violates Publisher's Copyright

    American Graffiti movie poster.Star Wars taught me the importance of contract drafting.  No, seriously!  I was reading for an Entertainment Law course two years ago when I came across a case from the 1980s involving Lucasfilm, LTD and Platinum Record, Co.  The lawsuit centered around a dispute over a contract which allowed director George Lucas to use four popular songs in his film American Graffiti, first released in 1973The issue in the case didn’t arise until almost a decade later, when MCA Distributing Corp. (an affiliate of Universal) released the film for sale and to rent on videocassette, which Platinum Record argued was in violation of their contract.

    By this point, you might be wondering what this has to do with ebooks (or Star Wars, for that matter).  Well, last week U.S. District Court Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald held that a 2011 ebook distribution deal signed by author Jean George violated an earlier, 1971 contract.  The 1971 contract granted publisher HarperCollins the right to publish the children’s book Julie of the Wolves in “book form” and “electronic means now known or hereinafter invented.”  This language in the contract is what caught my eye and provides an important lesson in contract drafting: think ahead.

  • A Lesson In Contract Drafting: eBook Deal Violates Publisher’s Copyright

    A Lesson In Contract Drafting: eBook Deal Violates Publisher’s Copyright

    American Graffiti movie poster.Star Wars taught me the importance of contract drafting.  No, seriously!  I was reading for an Entertainment Law course two years ago when I came across a case from the 1980s involving Lucasfilm, LTD and Platinum Record, Co.  The lawsuit centered around a dispute over a contract which allowed director George Lucas to use four popular songs in his film American Graffiti, first released in 1973The issue in the case didn’t arise until almost a decade later, when MCA Distributing Corp. (an affiliate of Universal) released the film for sale and to rent on videocassette, which Platinum Record argued was in violation of their contract.

    By this point, you might be wondering what this has to do with ebooks (or Star Wars, for that matter).  Well, last week U.S. District Court Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald held that a 2011 ebook distribution deal signed by author Jean George violated an earlier, 1971 contract.  The 1971 contract granted publisher HarperCollins the right to publish the children’s book Julie of the Wolves in “book form” and “electronic means now known or hereinafter invented.”  This language in the contract is what caught my eye and provides an important lesson in contract drafting: think ahead.

  • Law Firm Clerking 101

    I spent an amazing summer clerking at a law firm in downtown Nashville, TN.  Litigation was the last thing I thought I’d be doing, but it turns out (as everyone often says in law school) I enjoyed it more than I ever thought I would!  In all honesty, the process had a huge learning curve because I had never been in a law firm environment.  This blog post is an attempt to educate other law students about what you can expect going into a position clerking at a law firm.

  • When Musicians Die Young, So Do Their Copyrights

    The list of musicians who have died before they reach the age of 30 is strikingly long. [1]  Not to mention those who didn’t even make it past 27; such as Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, and Jimi Hendrix to name a few. [2] 

    Have you ever considered the impact an early death brings to an artist’s copyright ownership?

  • Check Out My Guest Blog Post!

    Check Out My Guest Blog Post!

    VLPA Spotlight – Ben & Brittany CooperHead over to the Arts & Business Council of Greater Nashville’s website for my guest blog post where I interview some friends of the Volunteer Lawyers and Professionals for the Arts (VLPA)! Check it out.